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Aging

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DNA methylation-based measures of biological age: meta-analysis predicting time to death

Overview of attention for article published in Aging, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 2,973)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
110 news outlets
blogs
10 blogs
twitter
92 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
539 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
528 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
DNA methylation-based measures of biological age: meta-analysis predicting time to death
Published in
Aging, September 2016
DOI 10.18632/aging.101020
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brian H. Chen, Riccardo E. Marioni, Elena Colicino, Marjolein J. Peters, Cavin K. Ward-Caviness, Pei-Chien Tsai, Nicholas S. Roetker, Allan C. Just, Ellen W. Demerath, Weihua Guan, Jan Bressler, Myriam Fornage, Stephanie Studenski, Amy R. Vandiver, Ann Zenobia Moore, Toshiko Tanaka, Douglas P. Kiel, Liming Liang, Pantel Vokonas, Joel Schwartz, Kathryn L. Lunetta, Joanne M. Murabito, Stefania Bandinelli, Dena G. Hernandez, David Melzer, Michael Nalls, Luke C. Pilling, Timothy R. Price, Andrew B. Singleton, Christian Gieger, Rolf Holle, Anja Kretschmer, Florian Kronenberg, Sonja Kunze, Jakob Linseisen, Christine Meisinger, Wolfgang Rathmann, Melanie Waldenberger, Peter M. Visscher, Sonia Shah, Naomi R. Wray, Allan F. McRae, Oscar H. Franco, Albert Hofman, André G. Uitterlinden, Devin Absher, Themistocles Assimes, Morgan E. Levine, Ake T. Lu, Philip S. Tsao, Lifang Hou, JoAnn E. Manson, Cara L. Carty, Andrea Z. LaCroix, Alexander P. Reiner, Tim D. Spector, Andrew P. Feinberg, Daniel Levy, Andrea Baccarelli, Joyce van Meurs, Jordana T. Bell, Annette Peters, Ian J. Deary, James S. Pankow, Luigi Ferrucci, Steve Horvath

Abstract

Estimates of biological age based on DNA methylation patterns, often referred to as "epigenetic age", "DNAm age", have been shown to be robust biomarkers of age in humans. We previously demonstrated that independent of chronological age, epigenetic age assessed in blood predicted all-cause mortality in four human cohorts. Here, we expanded our original observation to 13 different cohorts for a total sample size of 13,089 individuals, including three racial/ethnic groups. In addition, we examined whether incorporating information on blood cell composition into the epigenetic age metrics improves their predictive power for mortality. All considered measures of epigenetic age acceleration were predictive of mortality (p≤8.2x10(-9)), independent of chronological age, even after adjusting for additional risk factors (p<5.4x10(-4)), and within the racial/ethnic groups that we examined (non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics, African Americans). Epigenetic age estimates that incorporated information on blood cell composition led to the smallest p-values for time to death (p=7.5x10(-43)). Overall, this study a) strengthens the evidence that epigenetic age predicts all-cause mortality above and beyond chronological age and traditional risk factors, and b) demonstrates that epigenetic age estimates that incorporate information on blood cell counts lead to highly significant associations with all-cause mortality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 92 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 528 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Singapore 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 514 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 110 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 87 16%
Student > Bachelor 51 10%
Student > Master 49 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 38 7%
Other 111 21%
Unknown 82 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 111 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 84 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 84 16%
Neuroscience 26 5%
Psychology 26 5%
Other 86 16%
Unknown 111 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 974. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2021.
All research outputs
#10,315
of 19,512,142 outputs
Outputs from Aging
#1
of 2,973 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#231
of 285,615 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Aging
#1
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,512,142 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,973 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,615 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.